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K9 CPR & FIRST AID

K9 Class: The K9 First Aid and CPR course is designed to give the pet lover, dog sport enthusiast or pet professional the necessary information and skills to stabilize an injured animal until qualified veterinarian care is accessed.
 
Whether you are new to dog ownership or a long time friend, EMS provider, have a puppy, or care for a senior dog, own a purebred or a mixed breed from the shelter; regardless of your situation, your dog is precious to you. You only want the best for your dog, just like you want the best for every member of your family.
 
Since 2009, We have developed and have and taught over 2000 dog lovers a fun and educational K9 first aid class that is designed to be taught at any location. Since there is no 911 for dogs, it is our intention to close that gap. In short, we take our world of paramedicine and show students how to apply it to dogs.
 
One thing the class gives to the students is confidence. Confidence that no matter what the situation involving their dog, they will be able to provide care that will help for the best possible outcome. That alone can be priceless.
 
We use actual Canine CPR manikins where people actually preform “mouth to snout” breathing and compressions. The class content covers over 20 First Aid items including: first aid kits, torn pads, dog fights, seizures, broken bones, electrical injuries, muzzling, and bleeding control and appropriate restraining of an injured animal. There is special attention to choking, bloat, and poisons.
 
There are several hands-on-type skills, and the relaxed, open format is very conducive for learning. Since the material is paramedic-based, you can even use your new-found skills on humans (if you want to that is!). During class each person gets a class participation packet, and will receive a pet first aid certificate at no charge. The card is valid for life, and with the card, students may take the class at no charge anytime in the future.
 
Hope to see you soon.

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Just wanted to let you know about a crazy experience I had this past weekend - thank goodness I had taken your Canine CPR class! I was running with my lab on the trails that run alongside the canal ditches all around Arvada. Back at the house, my husband had started the self-cleaner in the oven. Although it uses no chemicals, it produces a nasty odor. After we returned from the run I began to notice that Mowgli was acting a little different from his usual post-run routine. He was sleeping, but almost in a comatose state. It was a long run, so initially I wasn’t terribly concerned…just thought it had been long enough to warrant a good morning nap. About an hour after the run, he began to follow me everywhere (also not totally out of the norm, but still enough to make me pause). We moved everyone outside at that point because the oven odor was awful.
Once outside, Mowgli’s movements were slow and it seemed he was concentrating hard just to walk. I started looking him over…checking heart rate (which wasn’t elevated yet), checking his gums and eyes, etc. and although there was nothing obvious, I did notice he was doing something strange with his eyes - he was squeezing them shut and then opening them a little wide and was doing that repeatedly. I initially thought he had a headache from the oven odor, so I stayed with him and began checking for snake bites or possible stings. Still nothing. A friend stopped by and commented that it was odd Mowgli did not get up to greet her. I remarked about his eyes and she agreed it looked like he had a headache. When I went back over to him, I noticed he had a slight tremor along his neck and head. It looked like a Parkinson’s shake and he couldn’t seem to put his head where he wanted it. At that point, I put him in the car to take him to the emergency clinic. I figured if all the obvious signs (HR, gums, temp, no vomit, no drooling) were normal, but there were strange physical behaviors, I needed to trust my gut and get him in. Mowgli began urinating uncontrollably on the ride to the vet. He was whining and began to shake all over. By the time we made it to the vet, he no longer had control over his legs and looked intoxicated. The clinic did a tox screen and (this still shocks the crap out of me), he had marijuana and cocaine in his system!!!!! He had obviously consumed something while on the run and I hadn’t even noticed it.
Mowgli stayed at the clinic all day and returned the following day. He was given IV fluids to flush out the THC, but the clinic said there wasn’t much we could do but wait out the Cocaine and hope there wasn’t enough to cause any cardiac or long-term neurologic issues. They were clear that a smaller dog might not have survived. I went to see him at the end of the evening. It was awful. The sedating effects of the marijuana were wearing off and the cocaine was causing him to panic. I would not wish that experience on anyone. It took three days before he seemed his old self again. He still seems more needy than normal, staying near me even more than before, but I’ll take a needy lab over losing him forever.
It sounds silly, but ever since taking your class, I have been much more aware of all of my pets. I notice what is “normal” so I can have a list to compare to when and if things shift. If I had ignored the signs or waited any longer, who knows what the outcome would have been. In the days that followed I went back up on the path and found multiple paraphernalia items. If my dog found something, so could a small child. I have notified neighbors and even sent out an email that covers neighborhoods for several miles. I can only hope the notice about the drugs and the details of the symptoms Mowgli demonstrated will help prepare other people.
Thanks again for a great class and for taking the time to read this.

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